Extra Credit Reads

Since I have been plugging away at a modern education for the last year, I have kept up on (some) things outside of it. The “modern” education I refer to is that technical education where you learn exactly your vocation and (almost) nothing else. It is the sort of education I prefer nowadays because the “extras” they give now are glops of brain-dissolving indoctrination. I am (now) a man that leans to a Catholic understanding of the world and so have no patience at brainwashing attempts.

But what I have been able to read the last two months are two real slow slogs by the simple fact that I have almost zero time in my day to fit them in. About one hour for both works.

The first,

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is pretty damned good. The sex scene (one so far) was complete gratuitousness “…she taught him how she liked to fuck…” Yeah, baby, I think I read that exact line in Penthouse Forum when I was a teenager! All that skill he showed up to that point and… that. Stephen King has nailed many a sex scene way better – even scenes between two shit-head teenagers. Aside from that “wart on an otherwise beautiful face” scene, Mieville has a great style; so good, in fact, you’d think he was from the 19th century. The pacing is quite slow, but I’m not of a Twitter epistemology so that doesn’t bug me. I expect payoff at the end.

Still couldn’t hear the guy speak on economics without spitting up my Corn Flakes™. I mean it’s the 21st century and you’re a socialist? Where did you get educated? America?

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Ha!

The other book is…

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I had read about a fourth of it a year or two ago and then… life and then I was looking for a good book to read and had forgot I never finished this. The great thing about this book is the man that wrote it. If you have ever seen or heard his program from the 50’s and 60’s, Life is Worth Living (I’m almost certain that was the title) you know what a great orator the man was. Very visceral, almost Shakespearean actor. When I reading it, I’m not doing it in my normal dull reading brain voice, but in Archbishop Fulton Sheen’s impassioned speech.

I also have lots and lots of Lafferty on the back burner including two complete volumes of his Centipede Press editions that I haven’t wanted to touch until I’m done with school. Motivation, you see.

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